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wire strip and crimp machine

2021-06-30 14:55:03

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WASHINGTON — When lawmakers negotiating police reform released a statement last week saying they had agreed on a framework and would keep talking, the words painted a rosy picture of discussions that in reality are teetering on collapse, according to those involved. Outside special interest groups are playing a critical role in the negotiation, as they often do on Capitol Hill, but this time the divide is pitting law enforcement representatives against one another and threatening any chance of success. Law enforcement are represented by different groups — the sheriffs, who cover most rural areas, have their organization, and urban police are divided, the unionized officers represented by one organization and police chiefs by another. And instead of unifying, the negotiations over reforms have left the police and the sheriffs feuding. Despite claims of progress, after more than three months the process is wearing on members and some are questioning whether the other side wants a deal or if political forces are too much to overcome. NBC News interviewed with more than half a dozen people from both parties, law enforcement and civil rights organizations, most who spoke on the condition of anonymity in reporting this article. The politics are becoming increasingly complex as Republicans are trying to turn urban crime rates into attacks on Democrats, who they paint as supporters of defunding the police and are warning suburban voters that crime could come to their doorstep if liberals remain in control of government. The police bill being negotiated in Congress wouldn't defund the police, but it is infused into the politics of passage. Lead Republican negotiator, Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina, publicly outlined five issues that would be the center of the discussions, but two have become sticking points: Section 242, the criminal conviction standard of police officers, and qualified immunity, the legal doctrine that limits lawsuits against cops. Those provisions are at the heart of Democrats’ demands for police accountability.

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