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wine bottle labeling machine

2021-07-05 15:51:36


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Athletes are trained to be tough; they've learned to push through the pain barrier and find courage when all hope might seem to be lost.But athletes in Iran have to be braver than most. For them, the battle isn't just on the field of play, it's also away from the arenas, where the consequences of their actions could be painful, even deadly."I am 100% fearful," judoka Vahid Sarlak tells CNN Sport. He knows fighting for his beliefs could end badly in a country where political activists and their families are routinely intimidated, arrested and can even be executed."Every day, my mom asks me not to do this, she is worried daily. But I say, 'I was born once, and I'll die once.' I have sworn that I'll fight for my freedom for as long as I'm alive."When asked to detail the kind of threats that she is facing, the soccer player Shiva Amini tries to make light of it, telling CNN: "SMS messages, such as 'We will cut your head off and send a picture of it to your family.' Do you want just one example, or do you want to hear the rest?"They used to say that sport and politics shouldn't mix, but those days seem to be a distant memory. In many parts of the western world, athletes are now using their platforms to shape social and political discourse.In Iran, sport and politics have always mixed, but it's the theocratic government that makes the rules and enforces them through fear.The former junior world champion wrestler Sardar Pashaei knows exactly what can be at stake; he campaigned to try and save the life of wrestler Navid Afkari, who was executed in 2020.Afkari's death became a rallying cry for athletes in Iran to unite and push for change in a campaign called 'United for Navid.'"If we be silenced today, we don't have anything to tell our children tomorrow," Pashaei told CNN.All three are now living in self-imposed exile abroad, where it's a little safer to be outspoken; all are brave, but all have been traumatized by years of harassment and intimidation.When asked if he fears for his life, the former karate international champion Mahdi Jafargholizadeh scoffed at the suggestion: "I died 20 years ago. I lost everything when I was in Iran. If you kill me again, you just killed a dead person."

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